This annual is the subject of one of the first plant favorite profiles I wrote, years ago. The reason I fell in love with this plant was the beautiful scent it had. Hidden among other plants in a container or given a patch of its own in the garden, once you catch the drift of this sweet perfume you will understand the love that it inspires.

One of the problems in planting it is how hard it has become to find a source for seeds. Once you find them, it is a very easy plant to grow. These seeds come from the Monticello Shop, connected with Thomas Jefferson’s famous historical home.

The generous 250-280 seeds per pack means there are plenty of places you can sow them to enjoy the fragrance.


This is an affiliate link that will take you to the Monticello site, where you can purchase these hard to find seeds.

Who Will Enjoy Mignonette

Those who love fragrance in the garden, and don’t mind plants that offer less of a visual show will feel the same affection for these plants that Josephine Bonaparte was said to have had. The French nickname for this plant means “Little Darling”.  Napoleon sent Reseda odorata seed directly from Egypt where it has its origins.

Growing annuals in containers will give anyone to opportunity to try out this flower on their balcony or in any sunny spot.

If you also want to explore the world of fragrant plants, get some seeds, read my plant profile page, and get planting.

Those Who May Not

I’ve read complaints about those who couldn’t smell anything special and didn’t think it was worth the trouble of planting it. Although there are reports of the strain of modern seeds as lacking in scent, it could be the fact that for some plants it is the conditions of the atmosphere, etc which govern the sensation of smell at a particular time.

There is no way to judge what another experiences, which is why I think that each plant should be given a chance with one’s own experience.

I have not been able to find named varieties such as ‘Machet’.

 

The Look

reseda odorata